Ktunaxa Kinbasket Treaty Council View Regional Map

Ktunaxa Kinbasket Treaty Council

Member Bands

Akisq'nuk / Columbia Lake First Nation
Location
: At Windermere Lake, near Windermere. (Two reserves, on 3,412.2 hectares.)

Number of Band Members: 263 (Source: Registered Indian Population by Sex and Residence September 2010, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada)

Yaqan nu?kiy / Lower Kootenay Indian Band
Location: On the Kootenay River, near Creston. (Eight reserves on 2,553.3 hectares.)

Number of Band Members: 213 (Source: Registered Indian Population by Sex and Residence September 2010, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada)

 
 
?Aq'am / St. Mary's Indian Band
Location: Main community is on Kootenay Indian Reserve #1, on the west bank of the Kootenay River at the mouth of the St. Mary's River, opposite Fort Steele and approximately 15 km northeast of Cranbrook. (Five reserves on 7,850.4 hectares.)

Number of Band Members: 353 (Source: Registered Indian Population by Sex and Residence September 2010, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada)

Tobacco Plains Indian Band
Location: Adjacent to the U.S. border, approximately 12 km south of Grasmere and 60 km southeast of Cranbrook. (Two reserves on 4,417.5 hectares.)

Number of Band Members: 178 (Source: Registered Indian Population by Sex and Residence December 2009 [last available data], Indian and Northern Affairs Canada)

Background

Negotiating status
: Negotiating a comprehensive treaty settlement within the British Columbia Treaty Commission six-stage treaty process.

Negotiating affiliation
: Negotiating with Canada and British Columbia on behalf of its four member bands. ?Akisq'nuk / Columbia Lake, Yaqan nu?kiy / Lower Kootenay, ?Aq'am / St. Mary's and Tobacco Plains bands are also are part of the Ktunaxa Nation tribal council.

The Shuswap Indian Band, which is not affiliated with the tribal council, was part of the treaty group. The band made the decision to withdraw from the treaty group and the treaty process in 2009. The decision was accepted by the BC treaty commission.

Location
: Member bands are located in the southeastern corner of the province, from the U.S. border north to the Invermere area, and as far west as Creston.

Total members
: Ktunaxa Kinbasket Treaty Council and Ktunaxa Nation Council – 1,007 (Source: Registered Indian Population by Sex and Residence September 2010, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada)

Negotiations

The Ktunaxa Kinbasket Treaty Council entered the treaty process in December 1993, and is now in Stage 4 of the six-stage process, negotiating a comprehensive agreement in principle which is intended to address all of the substantive matters required to conclude a final agreement.

Ktunaxa Strategic Engagement Agreement (SEA)

In October, 2010 the Province and Ktunaxa Nation Council signed a strategic engagement agreement that provides for government-to-government discussions on natural resource decisions within Ktunaxa territory.

Under the agreement, $1.65 million will be provided over three years for training and capacity building to help Ktunaxa Nation more effectively engage with the Province on land and resource development decisions. This is expected to result in more co-operative decision-making and lead to increased certainty for resource activities in Ktunaxa Territory.

Forest Agreements

November 2009: Ktunaxa Nation Council Community Forest Agreement

The community forest covers a total area of 20,000 hectares on two parcels of land in the Elk Valley, near Fernie. The 25-year agreement grants the Ktunaxa the right to harvest up to 5,790 cubic metres of timber per year from the area, also known as the Dominion Coal Blocks. It replaces a five-year pilot agreement and will be managed by Nupqu Development Corporation, which is owned by the Ktunaxa Nation and has provided services and expertise in forestry and resource management while operating as the Ktunaxa Kinbasket Development Corporation.

February 2010: Yaqan nu?kiy / Lower Kootenay Indian Band Forest Licence

The five-year, non-replaceable forest licence for 20,000 cubic metres per year awarded to the Lower Kootenay Indian Band will help stop the spread of the mountain pine beetle in the Englishman Creek area.  The band also received access to 55,215 cubic metres of timber as part of the Forest and Range Opportunity Agreement it signed with the Province in 2005.

Other Activities

June 2007: Network BC Grant to help preserve the Ktunaxa language

Funding for the Ktunaxa Nation Council to record, archive and preserve its language using FirstVoices, a suite of web-based tools and services developed by the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation and supported by the federal and provincial governments.

July 2008: BC, Regional District of East Kootenay (RDEK) and Ktunaxa First Nation Engagement Agreement on the Lake Koocanusa area

The engagement protocol allows the parties to develop a collaborative framework, solidifying intergovernmental relationships, as well as provide a forum to discuss resources required for planning in the Lake Koocanusa area located within the Ktunaxa Traditional Territory.

January 2009: Big Springs recreation area land transfer to Tobacco Plains Indian Band

The land transfer of approximately 6.7 hectares complements BC, Regional District of East Kootenay (RDEK) and Ktunaxa First Nation Engagement Agreement on the Lake Koocanusa area.

November 2009: BC Government Job Opportunities Program

$140,000 was made available to the Nupqu Development Corporation – the development arm of the Ktunaxa Nation – to workers to inventory invasive plants along transportation corridors and environmental restoration sites on reserve lands.

February 2010: BC, Montana, Ktunaxa Nation Council, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Memorandum of Understanding and Cooperation (MOU) on Environmental  Protection, Climate Action and Energy

A partnership agreement signed to sustain environmental values in the Flathead River Basin of south-eastern BC and the State of Montana.  Under the MOU, BC and Montana agree to work together, and in partnership with federal governments, Ktunaxa Nation and Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, local governments, and other community interests on three components – environmental protection, climate action and renewable and low-carbon energy.

September 2010: College of the Rockies Gathering Place

The Province is investing $450,000 in the gathering place, which is being built as a result of a collaborative effort among the college, the Ktunaxa Nation and other Aboriginal partners, as well as the college’s trades instructors and students.

Planned Meetings

As dates are established for public meetings, they will be publicized through the local media and posted on the British Columbia Treaty Commission website Negotiations Calendar.